Divorces that involve asset division and child custody are particularly complicated and heart-wrenching to navigate. Better they avoid getting divorced in the first place, right? Of course, the answer to this question is clear, but it’s a lot easier said than done. No couple wants to get a divorce, but being in an enduring marriage can be a miraculous feat in this day and age. All that said, millennials seem to be practicing something we should take note of because millennials have achieved record-low divorce levels.

What’s their secret? millennials are delaying marriage until they are older and it seems to be lowering their divorce rates. In fact, instead of getting married, a lot of 30-somethings are moving in with one another instead of saying “I do.”

Studies show that marriage trends have changed notably compared to decades ago. A study published by the National Center for Marriage and Family Research, for example, shows that just 11 percent of married women who tied the knot between 1965 and 1974 had lived with their future spouses before getting married. Meanwhile, between 2005 and 2009, 66 percent of married women had lived with their future spouses before marriage. This represents six times the numbers of the past.

Another thing that millennials do that could be helping their marriages to endure is — rather than asking for wedding gifts — they’re asking for cash. Is it possible that the extra cash is helping add more financial security to marriages which is helping them to endure? Perhaps.

At the end of the day, no strategy will fully guarantee against divorce, and in the event that millennials do require divorce proceedings, they will probably want to carry them out in a way that is peaceful and respectful to everyone involved — especially their children. For this reason, Maryland millennial parents who are going through a divorce may want to discuss their separation options with a qualified divorce lawyer who can help them child custody decisions, child support and other issues.

Source: Insider, “Millennials have figured out an approach to relationships that’s protecting them from divorce,” Kim Renfro, Sep. 12, 2016