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Can social media influence custody cases?

On Behalf of | Sep 17, 2021 | Child Custody |

With 8 out of every 10 Americans using some form of social media in this day and age, it is easy to say that it has embedded itself into the very fabric of our society. Reaching for a phone or tablet to post life updates is second nature to many by now.

But unfortunately, taking these actions when it comes to divorce can actually negatively impact the case as it unfolds.

Social media as monitored by courts

The Pew Research Center states that social media usage in the current day and age largely remains unchanged over the last few years. This sense of normalcy often prompts people to share things with the internet that they might not even share with their friends, feeling firmly safe even in situations where they are not.

The conduct of someone on their social media account may actually end up monitored by courts, who might use it against a parent during a child custody case. To avoid any impact on the chances of winning the case, careful monitoring of social media is necessary. First, take care of any posts related to the child in question. Any opposing attorney will look for even the smallest thing to use as an example of unfit parenting.

Lifestyle and sensitive subject posts

Next, do not discuss sensitive subjects. This also goes for hot button issues in society at large, but specifically applies to posts regarding an ex-spouse. In other words: no trash-talking in public.

Finally, keep an eye on lifestyle posts. Showing signs of wealth could end up reflecting on the amount of child or spousal support ordered by the court, while posts indicating partying or drinking could end up used by an opposing attorney to prove a person unfit for parenting.