Law Office of Kevin L. Beard, P.A.

Free Initial Consultation: 410-929-7197

Free Initial Consultation:
Law Office of Kevin L. Beard, P.A.

Free Initial Consultation: 410-929-7197

Free Initial Consultation:
In light of Covid-19, we are able to service our clients virtually. Please contact our office to schedule your virtual appointment.
In light of Covid-19, we are able to service our clients virtually. Please contact our office to schedule your virtual appointment.
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Is nesting an option for your family?

On Behalf of | Aug 2, 2022 | Child Custody |

In the wake of a marital split, you and your spouse may find it difficult to hammer out a viable co-parenting plan. If your children remain the priority, you may want to seek options that lessen the blow of a split custody arrangement. Nesting is one option that may prove viable for your situation.

When it comes to making your children feel comfortable, you and your ex may have to work together. A nesting arrangement does not work unless both parents agree. If this might apply to you, discover more about this newer trend in co-parenting.

What is nesting?

Nesting gets its name from the way birds rear their young. That is, baby birds remain in the nest until they are old enough to fly. Until that time, parents take turns returning to the nest to feed and care for them. The human form of this is similar. Parents take turns moving in and out of the home, allowing the children to stay in place.

How does nesting help children?

Since nesting keeps the children in one home, it helps minimize strife and emotional difficulties post-divorce. While nesting requires the children to remain in one place, both parents need separate living areas to return to when not with the children. This may not prove financially viable for every situation, but if you and your ex can make it work, it may drastically reduce the stress for your children.

Nesting may work better when children are very young. Once they move into school, moving back and forth between homes may not require so much upheaval. If you believe nesting is an option you want to explore, you should speak to someone who can help you effectuate it within your divorce documents.