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3 things to know about alimony

| Jan 13, 2021 | Divorce |

Alimony or spousal support is a payment one spouse makes to provide financial stability to the other spouse after a divorce. Not every case will involve the court assigning alimony, but in cases where there is a notable difference in the finances of the two parties, it is likely. 

At the Law Office of Kevin L. Beard, P.A., we want to help you understand more about alimony and how it may impact you. 

1. There are different types of alimony

The court may award a certain type of alimony in your case depending on the circumstances. Rehabilitative alimony is to help your former spouse become self-supporting. The court will award this for a specific period, giving you an end date. 

Temporary alimony occurs during the divorce after you separate. It is to help the spouse sustain his or her finances during the process. It ends when the court finalizes the divorce. 

The last type of permanent alimony. This is when the court awards payments with no end date. 

2. The law allows changes to alimony orders

Once the court issues an alimony award, it is not completely final. You will have to abide by the order, but if you have changes in your circumstances or your former spouse has changes, then you can request a modification to change the order. 

3. It is up to the court to award alimony

The court has a lot of say in who gets alimony and when to award it as the law is not very specific. It leaves the decision to the court. The court will consider your financial situations, your ages, your ability to support yourselves, your health and the length of your marriage in determining whether to award payments. It may also consider if one of you is at fault in the divorce and the standard of living during your marriage. 

To find out more about divorce and related topics, please visit our website.