Law Office of Kevin L. Beard, P.A.

Free Initial Consultation: 410-929-7197

Free Initial Consultation:
Law Office of Kevin L. Beard, P.A.

Free Initial Consultation: 410-929-7197

Free Initial Consultation:
In light of Covid-19, we are able to service our clients virtually. Please contact our office to schedule your virtual appointment.
In light of Covid-19, we are able to service our clients virtually. Please contact our office to schedule your virtual appointment.
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How does parallel parenting work?

On Behalf of | Apr 22, 2022 | Child Custody |

Many people have heard that joint parenting or co-parenting is often considered a good way to raise a child after divorce. However, this type of parenting may not suit everyone’s situation.

Fortunately, there are situations that allow you to reap some of the benefits of parallel parenting without needing to have everything that typical co-parents do.

What is parallel parenting?

Psychology Today discusses parallel parenting after divorce. Parallel parenting exists as an option for parents who want to give their child the benefits of growing up in a co-parenting situation but simply are not yet in a place where they can cooperate with one another to that degree for whatever reason.

As the name suggests, parallel parenting allows you and your co-parent to share custody without coming into direct contact with one another. Instead, you can contact through non-verbal means. You can choose written word, text messages, instant messages or emails.

What is the purpose?

In essence, the purpose of this is to give you and your co-parent time and space away from one another. It also gives you more time to consider your answers in conversations, so you do not end up getting into arguments as frequently, which is often more traumatic to children than anything else about the divorce.

It is possible to switch to another method of co-parenting. In fact, the courts consider parallel parenting a temporary solution and will periodically touch base with you to see whether or not you need to make changes in your situation.

But until you reach the point where you can comfortably co-parent, this option may suit your family situation well.